Appendix 1a

WML Gen-L09 – To keep birds of species listed on Schedule 4 bird for the purposes of rehabilitation.
WML Gen-L10 – To keep birds of species listed on Schedule 4 bird for the purposes of veterinary treatment (note the conditions are different to L09).
WML Gen-L30 – To permit the release of native bird species listed on Schedule 9.
Further information on licensing in England can be found at:
http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/ourwork/regulation/default.aspx

Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010
This legislation translates into UK legislation, the EEC Council Directive 92/43/EEC, The Conservation of Natural Habitats and of wild fauna and flora, known as the Habitats Directive. This legislation protects habitats and species across Europe and so includes species on animal found in the UK. These species are known as European Protected Species (EPS) and these regulations are the primary regulations protecting these species, NOT the Wildlife and Countryside Act. These species include the otter, common dormouse and all bats.

Section 41 provides protection for these European Protected Species (EPS) which are listed on Schedule 2. Like the Wildlife and Countryside Act, it has similarly worded defences for
rehabilitation of any species protected under Section 42. These Regulations require all those whoare keeping either a; a wild animal of an EPS species or b; part of, or anything derived of, a wild animal of an EPS species, to have a licence. Although rehabilitation is permitted under the Regulations, the various SNCOs are considering time limits for holding different species in care before a licence is required. For instance, you do not need a licence to rehabilitate a bat unless you intend to keep it for longer than six months.

Protection of Badgers Act, 1992
The Protection of Badgers Act (The Badger Act) is primarily aimed at protecting the welfare of wild badgers, a species that has been persecuted in the UK for many years. Like the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981, it has specific provisions for the rehabilitation of badgers, or their euthanasia:
Protection of Badgers Act 1992, Section 6. General exceptions.

A person is not guilty of an offence under this Act by reason only of—

(a) taking or attempting to take a badger which has been disabled otherwise than by his act and is
taken or to be taken solely for the purpose of tending it;

(b) killing or attempting to kill a badger which appears to be so seriously injured or in such a
condition that to kill it would be an act of mercy;

Deer Act, 1991
The Deer Act provides for the hunting of deer and so regulates how, and it what manner, deer may be taken. As such, it also includes provisions for rehabilitation and/or euthanasia: Deer Act 1991 Section 6, General exceptions:

(2) A person shall not be guilty of an offence under section 2 or section 3 above by reason of any act done for the purpose of preventing the suffering of an injured or diseased deer.

Conservation of Seals Act 1970
The Conservation of Seals Act was enabled to protect the British seal population, but it does give allowances for the control of seals in some circumstances. It also has the following provisions for rehabilitation:

The Conservation of Seals Act, 1970, Section 9, General Exceptions:

(1) A person shall not be guilty of an offence under section 2 or 3 of this Act by reason only of—

(a) the taking or attempted taking of any seal which had been disabled otherwise than by his act and was taken or to be taken solely for the purpose of tending it and releasing it when no longer disabled;

(2) A person shall not be guilty of an offence under section 1, 2 or 3 of this Act by reason only of the killing of any seal which had been so seriously disabled otherwise than by his act that there was no reasonable chance of its recovering.